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L'Ancien Regime

Introducing the new Microsoft Surface Studio 28" touchscreen

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http://www.cgchannel.com/2016/10/microsoft-unveils-surface-studio/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+cgchannel%2FnHpU+(CG+Channel+-+Entertainment+Production+Art)

 

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mental-canvas-ushers-drawing-into-a-new-dimension-300351779.html

 

 

 

 

I'm particularly fascinated with that Surface Dial device

 

https://www.wired.com/2016/10/microsoft-dial/

 

T

The most eye-catching feature of the Surface Studio is the sheer size of its screen. The 28-inch LCD display is capable of 4,500 x 3,000 resolution with a pixel density of 192ppi.

Despite the unusual 3:2 aspect ratio, that’s higher than the broadcast DCI 4K standard (4,096 × 2,160 pixels) and way higher than the UHD-1 standard used for most 4K monitors (3,840 x 2,160 pixels).

(For comparison, Wacom’s largest pen display, the Cintiq 27QHD, has a resolution of ‘just’ 2,560 x 1,440.)

 

Where conventional pen display tablets score over the Surface Studio is the pen itself.

Microsoft’s current Surface Pen is more of a writing and sketching tool than a full-blown graphics device, with 1,024 levels of pressure sensitivity.

Most Wacom devices support 2,048 levels, and its recently announced MobileStudio Pro pen displays will support a whopping 8,192. Wacom also offers a range of dedicated pen types, including a digital airbrush.

 

Where Wacom devices provide the firm’s trademark ExpressKeys and scroll wheel, the Surface Studio doesn’t have any dedicated on-board controls.

Instead, users can buy the optional $100 Surface Dial, an interesting new peripheral that can be used for anything from colour picking to scrubbing through audio or adjusting a 3D view.

When the Surface Studio detects that the Dial has been placed against the screen, a radial menu appears beneath it – which means that your software needs to support it actively.

At the minute, the only applications that do are Microsoft’s own, plus a limited number of sketching and drafting tools, shown in the video above: the one closest to a standard DCC app is animation package Moho.

That doesn’t mean that tools like Photoshop or ZBrush won’t run on the Surface Studio – despite its unusual shape, it’s a standard Windows 10 workstation at heart – it just means that you can’t use the Dial with them.

 

The Core-i5 configuration, which comes with the GeForce GTX 965M GPU, 8GB RAM and 1TB of storage, will cost $2,999.

The Core-i7 configuration with the GeForce GTX 965M GPU, 16GB RAM and 1TB storage costs $3,499; the configuration with the higher-end GeForce GTX 980M, 32GB RAM and 2TB storage will cost $4,199.

Edited by L'Ancien Regime
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Really impressed by the specs\features and form factor. Cant wait to see the stylus in action once released. Price is way out of my range though.

 

Edited by Nossgrr

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On 28.10.2016 at 1:45 AM, L'Ancien Regime said:

Microsoft’s current Surface Pen is more of a writing and sketching tool than a full-blown graphics device, with 1,024 levels of pressure sensitivity.

Most Wacom devices support 2,048 levels, and its recently announced MobileStudio Pro pen displays will support a whopping 8,192. Wacom also offers a range of dedicated pen types, including a digital airbrush.

 

Im pretty sure, that there are only a few people who will recognize the difference between 1,024 pressure levels sand 2,048. I have a chinese display graphic tablet with 1,024 levels and im pretty happy with the sensitivity, enough for sculpting anyhow.  And i really doubt that somebody needs actually 8,192 levels. Its like having a mobile phone with 41-Megapixels (ok, thats even worse :)... )

Im interrested in this product and the surface book , just saying :D. Microsoft has produced some nice products recently.

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https://www.wired.com/2016/10/microsoft-dial/?mbid=social_twitter

 

You Might Not Need Microsoft’s Surface Dial, But You’ll Want It

 

The Dial is Microsoft’s coolest input device ever, a silver puck accompanying the new Surface Studio computer. The gadget, which sits on the Studio’s 28-inch screen and twists like a doorknob, is a peripheral, like a mouse and keyboard. Except it’s not like those things at all.

The easiest way to understand the Dial is to consider its analog counterpart. If Surface Studio is your drafting table and the Surface Pen stylus is your pencil, then Dial is your palette. It’s the object you hold in your other hand that contains all the tools you dip into on a regular basis. “If a tool is used 99 percent of the time by 99 percent of the users they [app makers] might put that on radial dial,” says Scott Schenone, Surface’s product designer.

Dial clicks, double clicks, rotates, and detects screen position. Whether you’ll use it depends a lot upon why you use a computer to begin with. Microsoft created Dial specifically to make life easier for artists and designers—and for a certain type of creative (the type who can afford a $3,000 computer, for starters), it will do exactly that. The Bluetooth-connected gadget is like a physicalized shortcut. It parses what you’ve got on the screen—be it a map app, Photoshop, Microsoft Paint, whatever—and provides a radial menu of tools and shortcuts specific to the task at hand.

With Edge, Window’s browser, twisting the Dial scrolls through a web page. On Maps, it zooms or reorients a map. Other uses are more mundane—adjusting volume or screen brightness, undoing or redoing a given action, that sort of thing. But this is simple stuff accomplished easily enough with a tap, pinch, or swipe.

Where Dial gets more interesting is in the creative apps that Microsoft unveiled Wednesday. You can program Dial to adjust hue saturation, brush size, and screen orientation in Sketchable. Cooler still, you can rotate the entire canvas. In the drafting app Drawboard, you can use Dial to create a protractor. A haptic click, designed to feel like the tumblers on a lock, shifts your attention from searching for tools to using them. “People don’t have to be clicking different icons or task bars within apps,” says product manager Avi Negrin. “They can be entirely in their flow.”

Users can program the Dial to do essentially anything they want, but most of Dial’s tricks will come from developers. “It will take a little more time for more apps to take advantage of the Surface Dial on the screen,” says Brian Hall, Microsoft’s corporate vice president of devices. “We had a small cadre that we brought into the test early, but now is the time that we really start working with all the

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This dial thing is really hot stuff :)

 

Ordered yesterday a surface book (No more peeking at macbooks, yeah..), will test that dial once it is available.

Best season for Microsoft fanboys. :)

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The dial is insane.. I can just imagine configuring it with my most used functions.. Brush Size, Brush Style, Rotate View, Zoom.. List goes on.. Both hands never leaves the screen.

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