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nVidia GTX 470 or 480?

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Well like I said, this is pretty rare. I also have a pretty old video card, one of the earliest CUDA models, so it may not do it as much with newer cards.

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or maybe a driver problem. :)

I buy the Nvidia 470. Should be ok for the time being. :)

Peace,

Rich_Art. :good:

A significant difference between the 2 cards, 470 wants a 550 watt PU and 480 needs 600 watts.

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A significant difference between the 2 cards, 470 wants a 550 watt PU and 480 needs 600 watts.

I have a Galaxy GTX 275, and even though it's overclocked, I have noticed no problems whatsoever with CUDA. I've encountered plenty of bugs in the past several months and reported them to Andrew (they got fixed pretty quickly too, I should mention...thanks Andrew) and none of them were related to CUDA. I think you'll be perfectly happy with the card. CUDA doesn't make as much difference on the older NVidia cards, as the Manual states that CUDA performance scales in relation to the number of cores on the card. If you only have 64, it says you won't see any improvement over a quad-core CPU. But the 470 has about 448 cores and almost 1.3GB of VRAM, so you should notice a pretty big difference. You'll probably giggle the moment you have it installed and test it out. :D

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Interesting to know how fast/slow 470GTX would be in comparisson to 460GTX with 2Gb Ram, And would it be noticable loss in performance for 460gtx which has less amount of cuda cores in 3D Coat?

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Interesting to know how fast/slow 470GTX would be in comparisson to 460GTX with 2Gb Ram, And would it be noticable loss in performance for 460gtx which has less amount of cuda cores in 3D Coat?

Yes, me too.

I was thinking about buying a dell studio-xps 8100, it comes with a nVidia GTX460.

I dont know if its a good idea, maybe it would be better to have one custom made?

Anyone having some insights in this matter? I have very little!

Regards, Robert

Studio XPS 8100 - Intel Core i7 Processor 870 (2,93 GHz, 8 MB)

Or If it would make a big difference. I could also go for the

Intel® Core i7 Processor 880 (3.06GHz, 8MB)

Legitieme Windows® 7 Ultimate Engels

8.192 MB 1.333 MHz Dual Channel DDR3 (4 x 2 GB)

2 TB Dual harde schijf, RAID 0 "Stripe" (2 x 1 TB - 7.200 rpm)

1GB Nvidia® GeForce® GTX 460 Graphics Card

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Yes, me too.

I was thinking about buying a dell studio-xps 8100, it comes with a nVidia GTX460.

I don’t know if it’s a good idea, maybe it would be better to have one custom made?

Anyone having some insights in this matter? I have very little!

Regards, Robert

Studio XPS 8100 - Intel Core i7 Processor 870 (2,93 GHz, 8 MB)

Or If it would make a big difference. I could also go for the

Intel® Core™ i7 Processor 880 (3.06GHz, 8MB)

Legitieme Windows® 7 Ultimate – Engels

8.192 MB 1.333 MHz Dual Channel DDR3 (4 x 2 GB)

2 TB Dual harde schijf, RAID 0 "Stripe" (2 x 1 TB - 7.200 rpm)

1GB Nvidia® GeForce® GTX 460 Graphics Card

Robert, there are a host of reasons why you should almost always go the custom build route. The only reason to buy one of the shelf is if you don't know how to build your own and just don't have the time. Nevertheless, there are a number of companies that have custom builds, with all aftermarket parts. Check Ebay first. There are plenty of brick and mortar stores that happen to have a storefront on EBay. Many of them let you pick everything that goes into it, and none of them are OEM parts.

The main reason is that you will get EXACTLY the components you want and aftermarket parts are ALWAYS a cut above the OEM stuff you get in off the shelf builds (DELL, HP, etc). They also have extensive warranties on them. You have absolutely no overclocking capability in OEM parts. The Motherboard BIOS won't allow you to access CPU/GPU/Memory timings and voltage. The second reason is there is almost no room to expand in a pre-built case. Poor cooling and often no room to add a beefy card and definitely no room to add a second card (there are a number of renderers on the market now that take advantage of multiple GPU's...such as Octane, Arion, and Max 2012 will have iRay that will utilize multiple cards, as well as PhysX).

Both AMD (black box editions) and Intel CPU's have a significant amount of overclocking capability...which is like upgrading to a much higher end model without the added cost. Most aftermarket Motherboards come with overclocking software that lets even the novice tune it without any OC experience, all within the Windows environment. You just want to ensure that you buy a decent aftermarket CPU cooler (Zalman, Thermaltake, and CoolerMaster are usually good choices), and pick a case with good airflow (most come with fans in the front and back).

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118036

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103057

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106103

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835887023

http://www.newegg.com/Store/BrandSubCategory.aspx?Brand=1647&SubCategory=574&name=Zalman-Tech-Co-Ltd-CPU-Fans-Heatsinks

I would also make sure that you buy a Graphic Card that has aftermarket cooling on it...not the standard (reference) box. The reason is that these cards not only have much better cooling, but they generally have higher quality memory chips and GPU's that have a much higher overclocking yield. They generally are about the same price or very close. They are worth it. You can get a 470GTX and overclock it to perform like a 480, without it ever breaking a sweat. Again, the card will come with overclocking software that makes it easy for even a novice to work with.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125338

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127513

If you don't know how to build one yourself, and don't have the time, I would still shop for the components, and take it to a local Computer shop (that you trust) and let them build it for you...and have them overclock everything for you and test it for stability (they have software utilities that run long stress tests to ensure stability).

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The biggest problem IMO in building yourself is the lack of support, even if you do know what your doing. I built my current computer myself, it was my first that I built instead of buying. I was pretty sure I got everything right, but this computer crashes a lot, like a couple of times a week on average. I've never been able to find the cause in 3 years of looking so I've often wondered if there was something I did wrong when building and just didn't know it. With support they could either tell me whats wrong, or replace something for me, or walk me through a fix on the phone instead of me having to hunt for the info online.

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The biggest problem IMO in building yourself is the lack of support, even if you do know what your doing. I built my current computer myself, it was my first that I built instead of buying. I was pretty sure I got everything right, but this computer crashes a lot, like a couple of times a week on average. I've never been able to find the cause in 3 years of looking so I've often wondered if there was something I did wrong when building and just didn't know it. With support they could either tell me whats wrong, or replace something for me, or walk me through a fix on the phone instead of me having to hunt for the info online.

Well, you can always take it to a local shop and have them try and diagnose it. When certain components act up, they generally show different signs. You could try and run a software memory test (aftermarket motherboards usually have this utility on their software disk). Sometimes it may be as simple as a faulty memory chip, or miss-matched modules. If you tried to OC your memory timing, it sounds like the voltage is on the weak side and needs to be bumped up a tad.

There is a certain threshold you can reach in memory clock speed before you have to increase the voltage. In general, to OC the CPU, you increase the FSB (front side bus) speed , and it will increase the RAM speed accordingly. That is usually the only setting I will adjust. You could always go into the BIOS and back the memory clock speed down one notch and see if that helps. Memory is the most finicky part of all the components. One little thing is off just a bit and it can cause issues. Everything else is fairly hassle-free. I had to wrestle with my RAM a bit and ended up having to back it off the listed speed (1066), manually in order to get it stable. You'd be surprised at how much help you can glean from Youtube. You can type in something like "overclocking memory" and get all kinds of tips.

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Oh on mine I've tested or replaced just about everything there is except the mobo and CPU. But I don't want to go too far off topic.

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Oh on mine I've tested or replaced just about everything there is except the mobo and CPU. But I don't want to go too far off topic.

That sounds like it's an issue on the software side, then. Did you ever attempt to format your HD and re-install the OS (backing up critical files first, of course)? I've built my own systems for almost 2 decades now and I've had relatively few issues. I've bought 2 store-bought desktops in that time, as well, and one had both the CPU and MB go bad....took almost a month to get the PC back. So, even if you have support and a warranty, it won't help you while it's in the shop.

You normally have 5yr-lifetime warranties on graphic cards and MB's. Can't remember how long the CPU's are, I think they are lifetime (barring signs of misuse) as well.

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Yeah re-installed Vista at one point.

Sounds like a good time to take find a trustworthy local shop. That's why I said even if you don't have the time or patience to build a system yourself, you can still take them the components and have them install and OC (if you want that done) it. That way, you'll have some piece of mind that it's professionally done and you have some level of support should something go wrong.

I don't think they would like having someone buy all the parts themselves (instead of buying through them), but I would just tell them that you had planned to put it together yourself, yet have since changed your mind.

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I've been building my own boxes for the greater part of 13 years, so I always opt for custom built cases. If a problem hits, I can almost always guess the issue, and usually solve it with in a few hours at most, unless I have some crazy issue (like that annoying Wacom driver issue that happened last year during the released of Win7).

Anyway, as Don said... Always go with a custom box unless you don't know how to maintain it. In which case it's probably better to roll with a pre-built machine. Just my two cents.

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Robert, there are a host of reasons why you should almost always go the custom build route. The only reason to buy one of the shelf is if you don't know how to build your own and just don't have the time. Nevertheless, there are a number of companies that have custom builds, with all aftermarket parts. Check Ebay first. There are plenty of brick and mortar stores that happen to have a storefront on EBay. Many of them let you pick everything that goes into it, and none of them are OEM parts.

Thanks a lot for your suggestion AbnRanger.

I considered putting one together myself a few times before, but I always felt that it would be to much of a hassle and maybe not even worthwhile.

But after your advise it took me only a little bit of research to be convinced otherwise.

So yes, Im going to prepare myself now to understand the right steps, Im sure I will manage all right.

Are there any suggestions somewhere on this forum that you can recommend reading about what matters most for 3DCoat to work well on a computer?

Thanks for the links and helping.

Kind regards, Robert

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Another route is an outfit like @xi that uses the parts you stipulate and then does a 72 hour burn in before it ships. My box has been trouble free for two years. <_<

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Thanks a lot for your suggestion AbnRanger.

I considered putting one together myself a few times before, but I always felt that it would be to much of a hassle and maybe not even worthwhile.

But after your advise it took me only a little bit of research to be convinced otherwise.

So yes, Im going to prepare myself now to understand the right steps, Im sure I will manage all right.

Are there any suggestions somewhere on this forum that you can recommend reading about what matters most for 3DCoat to work well on a computer?

Thanks for the links and helping.

Kind regards, Robert

You can find all kinds of helpful tutorials on Youtube and elsewhere (3Dgameman.com is another good site with helpful video reviews and tutorials on installing components), to help you in the process. Once you put one together yourself, you won't want for a store-bought one again.

As for what is best for 3D Coat....RAM, RAM and some more RAM :D . That and as many CPU cores as you can afford. AMD has a six core CPU that beats all the Intel i7's, except the most expensive model (which happens to be a six core itself), and for a sweet price at about $265

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103849

good motherboard for that CPU:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130236R

A 470GTX or better video card (with 448 processor cores, which makes the biggest difference with CUDA performance in 3DC). Personally I would try to go with 12GB's, or more, of the fastest RAM you can afford. DDR3 modules are pretty affordable, so shop around a bit to get a good deal.

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Hi every one .

I'm new , i use a 3d coat 3.505A trial DX CUDA 64 bit win7 with my card GTX 470

I install latest driver 260.99 and try 263.6 (dev)

In 3dCoat i turn on CUDA but it's slow like without CUDA when i turn off

I use GPU-Z to view gpu load , it ~ 0 % ==> i think cuda not work with me

Anayone can help me,

Thank in advance and sorry for my english

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