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mroek

Differences between 3DC Printing and the regular 3D Coat

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There seems to be little information on what the real differences between 3DC Printing and the regular version of 3D Coat are.

In the comparison table on the main web page there is some limited info, but in the top row under the heading "All Main Functions" there's simply a "no" for 3DC printing, and a "Yes" for all the others.

I'd like to know which of the main functions are actually missing, not just that some are missing. I have of course done some research, and I have come to the conclusion that probably everything related to painting and UV mapping is removed, but what else?

I haven't downloaded and tried any version yet, mostly because I don't like to install and uninstall more than necessary (trying to keep my computer as clean as possible), so I try to learn as much as possible before committing to testing anything.

To be even more specific:

  1. Does 3DC Printing offer the exact same modeling tools and modeling options as the regular version?
  2. Are the menu systems and UI the same, so tutorials made for/with 3D Coat can be followed also with 3DCPrinting?

My inteded usage is modeling (probably 99% with the intention to 3D print the final model), so it would seem that 3DC Printing should be a match for me, but I don't want to buy it and then realize that it still misses something important down the line.

 

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Hi 

3DC Printing offer the exact same modeling tools and modeling options as the regular version. 

3DCP as only Sculpt Room -as found on profesional version-, with more development target to print workflow.

The amount of Alphas and Shaders are restricted, are few.

This playlist have all the information that your are searching, plesae take a look.

 

 

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Thanks for replying!

I have seen that playlist, but I'm not sure I agree that it answers all the questions.  :-)

Your answer seems to indicate that the Sculpt room in 3DC Printing functions very much like the one in the Professional version, but that it has only a few alphas and shaders. Being a novice to this kind of modeling (I'm currently using traditional CAD), I don't fully understand what this limitation entails. In this context, I can only assume that for instance alpha masks are used with modeling brushes, and that in 3DC Printing you cannot download and add any additional ones? Is it possible to get an example of what this limitation might mean? Like some concrete modeling task that would be difficult or impossible in 3DC Printing due to the limited number of alphas and shaders?

Sorry if I'm being dense here, just trying to understand the possible limitations.

And one more question: Is 3DC Printing usually updated simultaneously to the professional version?

 

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Alphas on 3DCoat means Photoshop Brushes, can be created easily. 

Mask are named Stencils.

Shaders means 3D materials for visualization, cant be exported. So if you need to paint your models, the professional version is the only way to achieve it. 

Yes, 3DC Printing usually updated simultaneously to the professional version.

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Ah, that explains a bit. I'm very familiar with working in Photoshop, and if 3DC Printing allows for import of both Alphas and Stencils (which your answer indicates), then I think 3DC Printing may be just fine for my intended usage. Shaders aren't important for me, since I don't really need to paint and decorate the models. I guess all kinds of rendering is also removed from 3DC Printing, then? No default material and basic rendering just to visualize?

Again, thanks for taking the time to help me out!

 

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Yes,  all kinds of rendering is also removed from 3DC Printing.

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Hmm, I've done some more research, and it seems that 3DC Printing also lacks retopo. I'm not really sure that's something I'd need, just noticed it.

What is worse, is that it seems you cannot install extensions either. Brush packs, for instance. And that's a major disadvantage. You can add new brushes, but it seems you need to do it one by one, and that's cumbersome. This is a limitation I don't really get. Even if I'm not going to paint and render anything, using various brushes from extension packs when sculpting can be very useful. So that's pretty disappointing, actually.

 

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Turns out I was (thankfully) somewhat mistaken in my assumption in the previous post. 3DC printing supports brushes in the .penpack format, just not the extension format. Not sure if there's some easy way to convert brushes in the extension pack to a .penpack, but finding brushpacks that are in the supported format seems easy enough.

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Alpha Panel Drop-Down Menu

 

Brush-Components-Alpha-Panel-Drop-Down-3

 

A set of functions allowing you to view and change the current Brush Settings, Add and Create new Brush Folders, Add Brush “Packages” – as well as choose a display size for your Brush Alphas.

  • Refresh Alpha Preview: Refreshes the Alpha icon.
  • Brush Settings: Opens the “Brush Options” panel.
  • Add New Folder: Allows you to choose a directory of Alphas to be added to the “Folder” list.
  • Add Existing Folder: Allows you to choose a single Brush alpha from a folder, thus adding all the alphas in the folder to be included in the folder, now with the name of the chosen file, which is then listed in the “Folder” selection list.
  • Add Brushes From Package: Adds Alphas that have been packaged into a “Penpack” file format.
  • Folder: A selection list of all folders you have enabled 3DCoat to access. The icons from this chosen folder will then be visible in the “Brushes Panel”.
  • Tiny (or Normal, Large and Huge): Sets the Alpha icon set to the size specified.

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I never used the paint stuff until about 3 months ago. Until then, I had been using 3dc exclusively for surface sculpting on models designed in Rhino. Then I thought of a use for 2d images.

If you are using an fdm/fff printer you may have already figured out that by applying a rough texture in the sculpt room  to a model, you can increase the printed layer height and wind up with fast prints with no obvious layer lines.

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